Hayek as Duchampian Art Object

Mosley's sculpture of Hayek

JOSHUA MOSLEY:  “In the animation and sculpture work I built a conversation between Hayek and George Brown using several sources. This is not formed as a political statement. It is focused on the way that both George Brown and Hayek continuously migrated between the theoretical and actual world.”

UPDATED  Mosley has sent me an updated closeup of his Hayek sculpture (at left) which I much like.  Mosley will add some remarks on his work in the comments later today, which I’ll then re-post here at the top.  My excuse for my identification problem –  it was hard to recognize Hayek without his pipe!  And, of course, the now famous glasses ..

ORIGINAL POST  Artist Joshua Mosley does Hayek in Chicago.  Sculptures here, dialogue here, photos here.  If there is any intelligence behind this, it escapes me.  But I’ve been bored by “conceptual” art since the days when I studied it with a New York critic as a college kid.  For whatever reason, I had a hard time figuring out which sculpture was Hayek.

I trust the limitations here are my own, and not the artist’s, who seems to be well regarded.  Again, my bad on the conceptual art angle.  Visually, I liked the photos of the model truck cruising through the real world of a photo (out-takes from an animation).

Here’s the press release for the exhibit, and the gallery’s home page.  Mosley’s own home page for the exhibit is here.

My understanding is that the Hayek dialogue is taken from this video interview with John O’Sullivan.

UPDATE II:  From Lauren Weinberg’s review of the exhibit:

Hayek and Brown, accompanied by Mosley’s pensive piano composition, discuss the “altruism” of profit seeking and the need for government to support business. The artist doesn’t reveal his opinion of these beliefs, or what links the duo to the truck and Oregon. His bronze sculptures of Hayek and Brown could portray them as “great” men or parody real monuments with their small scale. The animation’s three distant locations, all integral to 20th-century commerce, make us consider how ideas as well as goods cross borders—but International remains frustratingly opaque.

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2 Responses to Hayek as Duchampian Art Object

  1. In the animation and sculpture work I built a conversation between Hayek and George Brown using several sources. This is not formed as a political statement. It is focused on the way that both George Brown and Hayek continuously migrated between the theoretical and actual world.

    The points about Conceptual or Duchampian art are not too specific, nor accurate, although it is interesting to note that the waterfall background of Duchamp’s Étant donnés was photographed 5km from Mont Pelerin in 1946, 7 months before the MPS conference. Duchamp turned his back to the lake, while the society looked out into it.

  2. Greg Ransom says:

    Joshua, I make use of the words “conceptual art” and “Duchampian” in a popular sense fit for the readers of this blog. I’m aware that more recent art theorists have stipulated very narrow meanings for these terms for their own purposes and to generate their own literatures.

    For the needs of a blog post, I don’t much worry about these purposes and literatures, and I guessing most of my readers don’t as well.

    Like conceptual art itself, people can be provoked to think about the juxtaposition of my remarks with the links and picture found next to them.

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